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Is Organic Food Worth it? | American Health Council

Is Organic Food Worth it?

Is Organic Food Worth it? - Health Council

Many of us like the term ‘organic’ but when it comes to actually pursuing the lifestyle, we wonder if it’s actually worth it. Can you tell the difference between conventional and organic food? We all know you can tell by the price, but do we try it out long enough to witness the difference in our health? The benefits of eating organic has been overlooked by many, and under looked by individuals who need it the most. There was a big meta-analysis published from the British Journal of Nutrition, stating that there is a “significant and meaningful difference in composition between organic and non-organic crops/crops based food.” Not only did they find higher antioxidant levels, and lower cd compounds; They noted that the pesticide count in conventional food is 4x higher than organic, and has higher levels of of toxic metal cd.

We all know pesticides are terrible for the environment, but what is the effect on us? Unfortunately there is still a lot of controversy over the this. There has not been enough thorough research to show the extremities, but having chemicals in our bodies over time, cannot be well. Now when we take a look at pesticides on food, a study has compared it to a building an immune system.

“For example, if a carrot fly lands on a carrot and starts to chew on it, what options does the plant have?If it’s a conventionally grown carrot, a pesticide can be applied to repel the pest.

But in organic agriculture, that carrot has to fend for itself a bit more. So, Seal explains, the carrot produces compounds known as polyacetylenes, which taste bitter to the carrot fly.

These polyacetylene compounds may help drive the fly away — and, serendipitously, this compound may benefit us as well.

Research in animals suggests polyacetylene compounds may play a role in reducing inflammation and cancer risk, but it’s unclear how much must be eaten to benefit human health.”

So is organic food worth it? Is your health worth it?

Check out the full article: Is Organic More Nutritious? New Study Adds To The Evidence